Southeast Asia/Asean

Featured Titles
Lontar #7: The Journal Of Southeast Asian Speculative Fiction by Lundberg, Jason Erik Et Al (Eds.)

This seventh issue of LONTAR presents speculative writing from and about Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Laos, the Philippines, Indonesia and Korea. Inside these pages, you'll find: a remembrance of ghostbusters disguised as lion dancers by Zen Cho; the subversive power of jazz in a future North Vietnam by TR Napper; a cautionary tale of writing one's perfect lover into existence by Vida Cruz; an expedition to hunt a supernatural tiger in colonial Singapore by Manish Melwani; the relationship between death and a mysterious delivery truck by James Penha; a fateful meeting of the last two Eurasians in Singapore by Melissa De Silva; a critical appreciation of the novels of Eka Kurniawan by Tiffany Tsao; a comic on schoolyard bullying and redemption by Elvin Ching; and speculative poetry from Bryan Thao Worra, Zeny May Recidoro, Brandon Marlon, Subashini Navaratnam, Russ Hoe, Christina Sng, Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé, Cyril Wong. LONTAR is the world's only biannual literary journal focusing on Southeast Asian speculative fiction. Its many contributors have won major literary awards in Singapore, USA, UK, Taiwan, Japan and the Philippines.

Reframing Modernism: Painting From Southeast Asia, Europe And BeyondReframing Modernism: Painting From Southeast Asia, Europe And Beyond by Lee, Sarah; Sara Siew

What is modernism in Southeast Asia? What is modern art, as embodied in the paintings of Southeast Asia? These questions and more are answered in Reframing Modernism: Painting from Southeast Asia, Europe and Beyond, published in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name. Featuring 217 works, in full colour, by 51 Southeast Asian and European artists, from the Centre Pompidou and National Gallery Singapore, as well as other Southeast Asian collections in the region and beyond, this catalogue tells the compelling story of modernism as it developed across continents, and reveals artists' powerful, and sometimes surprising, responses to modernity.

South-East Asian Soups: Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, CambodiaSouth-East Asian Soups: Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, Cambodia by Tan, Terry

Throughout Southeast Asia, soups and broths are designed to cleanse the mouth and refresh the palate. Bowls of steaming broth are often served alongside the main course, so that diners can slurp a spoonful of soup in between spoonfuls of rice or the main dish. This book features an appetizing range of recipes from Thailand and China, through Japan and Korea, down to the south-east Asian islands of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. You may choose to serve any of the soups solo, as a light lunch or supper dish, or as a prelude to a dinner party - but whenever you place them before your guests, these treats are certain to prove popular.

South-East Asian PlaysSouth-East Asian Plays by Robsons, Cheryl; Aubrey Mellor

A unique collection of seven plays by playwrights from countries in South-East Asia, including Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Cambodia. Covering topics as diverse as the global financial crisis, religious faith, the sex trade, corruption, and exploitation, these plays provide insight into the differing concerns of those living in a part of the world that is experiencing profound change.

Artist And Empire: (En)Countering Colonial LegaciesArtist And Empire: (En)Countering Colonial Legacies by Low Sze Wee (Ed.)

Organised by National Gallery Singapore in association with Tate Britain, Artist and Empire: (En)countering Colonial Legacies critically examines the effects of the British Empire through the prism of art. This catalogue accompanying the exhibition underscores the thought-provoking ways in which artist and Empire each affect the other-artists negotiating historical conditions of colonialism in their work, visual representation altering perceptions of the Empire. Essays by exhibition curators and external scholars situate the concept of Empire within broader socio-political discourse, while selected key artworks from the exhibition are paired with curatorial text that illumines concerns underpinning the works. A comprehensive, pull-out timeline spanning the 16th to 20th centuries charts the scope of activities undertaken in the name of the Empire, and contextualises the pursuits of artists from former colonies.

Admiral Matelieff's Singapore And Johor, 1606-1616Admiral Matelieff's Singapore And Johor, 1606-1616 by Borschberg, Peter (Ed.)

Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge (c.1570?1632) was admiral of the Dutch East India Company when it sailed to Asia in 1605 and besieged Portuguese Melaka in 1606 with the help of Malay allies. A massive Portuguese armada then arrived from Goa to fight the Dutch and succeeded in breaking the siege on the Portuguese colony. Throughout this time, Matelieff penned a series of letters in which he provided a candid assessment of trading opportunities and politics in Asia. Admiral Matelieff's Singapore and Johor offers an edited selection of Matelieff's most important writings from this period, focusing on his experience and interest in Singapore and the Straits of Melaka. The rediscovery of Matelieff's writings have helped to reshape the way local history is taught and understood in Singapore and Malaysia, and this collection will be essential to scholars of the region.

Writing The South Seas: Imagining The Nanyang In Chinese And Southeast Asian Postcolonial LiteratureWriting The South Seas: Imagining The Nanyang In Chinese And Southeast Asian Postcolonial Literature by Bernards, Brian

Postcolonial literature in Chinese from the Nanyang, literally the South Seas, examines the history of Chinese migration, localization, and interethnic exchange in Southeast Asia, and offers a rich variety of approaches to identity. Brian Bernards explores why Nanyang encounters, which have been neglected by most literary histories, should be seen as crucial to the national literatures of China and Southeast Asia. He shows how Nanyang, as a literary trope, has been deployed as a platform by mainland and overseas Chinese writers to rethink colonial and national paradigms. Through a collection of diverse voices-from modern Chinese writers like Xu Dishan, Yu Dafu and Lao She to postcolonial Southeast Asian authors from Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand-writers such as Ng Kim Chew, Chia Joo Ming, Pan Yutong, Yeng Pway Ngon, Suchen Christine Lim, Praphatson Sewikun and Fang Siruo-Bernards demonstrates how the Nanyang imagination negotiates the boundaries of national literature as a meaningful postcolonial subject, and speaks to broader conversations in postcolonial and global literature. This book, written from the emerging field of Sinophone Studies, puts the literature of the region in a new light.

Southeast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19Th CenturySoutheast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19Th Century by Tiffin, Sarah

British artists and commentators in the late 18th and early 19th century encoded the twin aspirations of progress and power in images and descriptions of Southeast Asia's ruined Hindu and Buddhist candis, pagodas, wats and monuments. To the British eye, images of the remains of past civilisations allowed, indeed stimulated, philosophical meditations on the rise and decline of entire empires. Ruins were witnesses to the fall, humbling and disturbingly prophetic, (and so revealing more about British attitudes than they do about Southeast Asia's cultural remains). This important study of a highly appealing but relatively neglected body of work adds multiple dimensions to the history of art and image production in Britain of the period, showing how the anxieties of empire were encoded in the genre of landscape paintings and prints.

30 Art Friends: Collecting Southeast Asian Art30 Art Friends: Collecting Southeast Asian Art by Quek Tse Kwang

This volume is a collection of 90 essays written by 30 collectors from the Philippines, Malaysia and Singapore. It showcases lavish photographs, references and research information for collectors and art lovers all around the world. It features forewords by President Benigno Aquino, Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak, and Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

Sijori Cross-Border Region, The: Transnational Politics, Economic And CultureSijori Cross-Border Region, The: Transnational Politics, Economic And Culture by Hutchinson, Francis E, Terence Chong (Eds.)

Twenty-five years ago, the governments of Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia agreed to jointly promote the city-state, the state of Johor in Malaysia, and the Riau Islands in Indonesia. Facilitated by common cultural references, a more distant shared history, and complementary attributes, interactions between the three territories developed quickly. Initially economic in nature, the interactions between Singapore, Johor, and the Riau Islands have multiplied and grown deeper. Today, people cross the borders to work, go to school, or avail of an increasing range of goods and services. New political, social, and cultural phenomena have developed. Policymakers in the various territories now need to reconcile economic imperatives and issues of identity and sovereignty. Enabled by their proximity and increasing opportunities, families have also begun to straddle borders, with resulting questions about citizenship and belonging. Using the Cross-Border Region framework - which seeks to analyse these three territories as one entity simultaneously divided and bound together by its borders - this book brings together scholars from a range of disciplines.

Lontar #6: The Journal Of Southeast Asian Speculative FictionLontar #6: The Journal Of Southeast Asian Speculative Fiction by Lundberg, Jason Erik Et Al (Eds.)

This sixth issue of LONTAR presents speculative writing from and about Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines, Cambodia and Laos. LONTAR is the world's only biannual literary journal focusing on Southeast Asian speculative fiction. Our contributors have won major literary awards in Singapore, USA, UK, Taiwan, Japan and the Philippines.

Early Kingdoms: Indonesian Archipelago & The Malay PeninsulaEarly Kingdoms: Indonesian Archipelago & The Malay Peninsula by Munoz, Paul Michel

At a time when sea navigation depended more on the skill and courage of sailors than on technology, men were nonetheless able to build maritime regional empires that stretched from Indochina to the Indonesian Archipelago. This book, which draws on a huge body of archaeological and documentary research, provides a much-needed overview of the history of the Malay Peninsula and insular Southeast Asia from its earliest times to the 16th century. It also provides an in-depth analysis of the international context of the political, economic and social evolution of these kingdoms, and so provides a useful background to the modern history of the region. This is an excellent book for those with a keen interest in the ancient history of the first kingdoms of the Malay Peninsula and Indonesian Archipelago.

South China Sea Dispute, The: Navigating Diplomatic And Strategic TensionsSouth China Sea Dispute, The: Navigating Diplomatic And Strategic Tensions by Storey, Ian; Cheng-Yi Lin (Eds.)

Increasing tensions in the South China Sea have propelled the dispute to the top of the Asia-Pacific's security agenda. Fuelled by rising nationalism over ownership of disputed atolls, growing competition over natural resources, strident assertions of their maritime rights by China and the Southeast Asian claimants, the rapid modernization of regional armed forces and worsening geopolitical rivalries among the Great Powers, the South China Sea will remain an area of diplomatic wrangling and potential conflict for the foreseeable future. Featuring some of the world's leading experts on Asian security, this volume explores the central drivers of the dispute and examines the positions and policies of the main actors, including China, Taiwan, the Southeast Asian claimants, America and Japan.

Do Young People Know Asean? Update Of A Ten-Nation SurveyDo Young People Know Asean? Update Of A Ten-Nation Survey by Thompson, Eric C.; C. Thianthai & M. Thuzar

In 2007, a survey was carried out to gauge young people's awareness of and attitudes towards ASEAN. Views and attitudes from university undergraduates in the ten ASEAN member states who participated in the survey indicated a nascent sense of identification as citizens of the region as well as their priorities for important aspects of regional integration. An update to the 2007 survey was carried out in 2014-15 among the same target population but with an expanded scope of twenty-two universities and institutes of higher learning across the ten member states. This book details the key findings of the updated survey compared to the earlier survey. These include nation-by-nation results and a summary of region-wide trends, as well as what they suggest for the prospects of ASEAN integration beyond 2015. These are assessed in a chapter providing broad recommendations for policymakers and educators in the ASEAN member states.

Ancient Postcards On Rice In The Golden PeninsulaAncient Postcards On Rice In The Golden Peninsula by Poupon, Roland

Ancient Postcards on Rice in the Golden Peninsula focuses on rice cultivation in mainland Southeast Asia, encompassing Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar. Through the analysis of old postcards, this book shows all aspects of rice culture from landscaping to trading, including land preparation, irrigation, sowing and transplantation, harvesting and threshing, postharvest processes, transportation, sales and consumption, but it also speaks about people, their homes, and their rituals.

Asean Looks West: Asean And The Gulf RegionAsean Looks West: Asean And The Gulf Region by Herrmann, Wilfried A.; Peter Lehr

This is the first major study analyzing the relationship between ASEAN and the Gulf region. A newly formed international team of eleven scholars and experts from seven different countries under the umbrella of the Thai-registered nonprofit organization Human Development Forum Foundation provides some interesting insights in security and economic developments on both sides of the newly introduced Southern Asian Maritime Corridor stretching from Qatar to the Philippines. What are the major challenges and opportunities for the ASEAN Community and the Gulf region? The scholar team answers these questions by extensively analyzing the strategic framework from an ASEAN perspective, highlighting the three-pillar strategy of the ASEAN Community, and then addressing two major security issues: the maritime component and religious fanaticism.

Karen Language Phrasebook: Basics Of Sgaw DialectKaren Language Phrasebook: Basics Of Sgaw Dialect by Rhoden, T. F

Comprehensive guide to the basics of Sgaw dialect of Karen language. Learn key phrases and words to use with any Karen companion, whether they live in Myanmar, Thailand, or wherever in the world. Phrasebook is for more than just learning to survive in a Karen-speaking environment. The goal is also to help you make new friends.

Heat: A Southeast Asian Urban AnthologyHeat: A Southeast Asian Urban Anthology by Khairani Barokka & Ng Yi-Sheng

This collection of stories is gathered from six different Southeast Asian nations: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Singapore. As part of the selection process, the editors tried to select the more unexpected, thoughtful and risk-taking from the available pool of writing, forging from them a compendium of twisted, tender visions of the region.

Flesh: A Southeast Asian Urban AnthologyFlesh: A Southeast Asian Urban Anthology by Khaw, Cassandra; Angeline Woon

This anthology comprises works of writers from all over Southeast Asia, exploring what it is like to be flesh in this urban environment, a situation akin to that of the tightly-fitted cellular bodies that make up organs. And from organs, bodies, people, echoes, cities ... on to galaxies.

Trash: A Southeast Asian Urban AnthologyTrash: A Southeast Asian Urban Anthology by Alfar, Dean Francis; Marc De Faoite (Eds.)

TRASH is part of a threesome of Southeast Asian urban anthologies. The other two are called HEAT and FLESH. It features stories about Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines and Indonesia. The writers have sorted through the 'trash' and found things that can be valued as still useful, things that deserve to be salvaged, and recycled, or reused, but they also point unflinchingly at structures, strictures, and modes of thought that have clearly served their time and must be discarded.