Southeast Asia/Asean

Featured Titles
Life Beyond Boundaries, ALife Beyond Boundaries, A by Anderson, Benedict

An intellectual memoir by the author of the acclaimed Imagined Communities. Born in China, Benedict Anderson spent his childhood in California and Ireland, was educated in England and finally found a home at Cornell University, where he immersed himself in the growing field of Southeast Asian studies. He was expelled from Suharto's Indonesia after revealing the military to be behind the attempted coup of 1965, an event which prompted reprisals that killed up to a million communists and their supporters. In this book, Anderson recounts a life spent open to the world. Here he reveals the joys of learning languages, the importance of fieldwork, the pleasures of translation, the influence of the New Left on global thinking, the satisfactions of teaching, and a love of world literature. He discusses the ideas and inspirations behind his best-known work, Imagined Communities (1983), whose complexities changed the study of nationalism.

Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas Of Mirrors CatalogueSingapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas Of Mirrors Catalogue by Singapore Art Museum

The fully illustrated catalogue for the Singapore Biennale 2016 - titled 'An Atlas of Mirrors' - presents artworks by 63 artists and artist collectives from Southeast, East and South Asia. Forging the literal and metaphorical characteristics of the atlas and mirror into a prismatic instrument of vision and thought, this fifth edition of the Singapore Biennale draws on diverse artistic viewpoints that trace the migratory and intertwining relationships within the region, and reflect on shared histories and current realities with wider Asia. The Biennale artworks - which include several new commissions - are organised under nine subthemes, each with its own introductory essay by one of the nine Biennale curators. The publication also features curatorial texts on each of the artworks, an introduction by Creative Director Dr Susie Lingham and essays by John N. Miksic, Joan Kee and Michelle Lim.

Asean Environmental Legal Integration: Sustainable Goals?Asean Environmental Legal Integration: Sustainable Goals? by Koh Kheng-Lian; Nicholas Robinson Et Al

While the environmental performance of most ASEAN member states is above the world average, ASEAN nations will continue to face growing environmental challenges due to pressures exerted on them such as population growth, urbanization and industrialization. The authors of this book look at how the member states of ASEAN employ law as a means of regional integration within the context of environmental conservation. While the goal of new laws is to implement sustainable development, it continues to be an ongoing adaptive process, since clear and immediate answers to environmental challenges are rarely available. Readers of this book will gain a clear idea of the evolving cooperation for sustainability within ASEAN at regional and global levels, and the areas of focus for the future. The book will be of interest to policy and decision makers, as well as environmental organizations and academics in the field.

Cities In Motion: Urban Life And Cosmopolitanism In Southeast Asia, 1920-1940Cities In Motion: Urban Life And Cosmopolitanism In Southeast Asia, 1920-1940 by Lewis, Su Lin

In the 1920s and 1930s, the port-cities of Southeast Asia were staging grounds for diverse groups of ordinary citizens to experiment with modernity, as a rising Japan and American capitalism challenged the predominance of European empires after the First World War. Both migrants and locals played a pivotal role in shaping civic culture. Moving away from a nationalist reading of the period, Su Lin Lewis explores layers of cross-cultural interaction in various spheres: the urban built environment, civic associations, print media, education, popular culture and the emergence of the modern woman. While the book focuses on Penang, Rangoon and Bangkok - three cities born amidst British expansion to the region - it explores connected experiences across Asia and in Asian intellectual enclaves in Europe. Cosmopolitan sensibilities were severely tested in the era of post-colonial nationalism, but are undergoing a resurgence in Southeast Asia's civil society and creative class today.

Justice In Asia And The Pacific Region, 1945-1952Justice In Asia And The Pacific Region, 1945-1952 by Yuma Totani

This book explores a cross-section of war crimes trials that the Allied powers held against the Japanese in the aftermath of World War II. More than 2,240 trials against some 5,700 suspected war criminals were carried out at 51 separate locations across the Asia Pacific region. This book analyzes fourteen high-profile American, Australian, British, and Philippine trials, including the two subsequent proceedings at Tokyo and the Yamashita trial. By delving into a large body of hitherto underutilized oral and documentary history of the war as contained in the trial records, Yuma Totani illuminates diverse firsthand accounts of the war that were offered by former Japanese and Allied combatants, prisoners of war, and the civilian population. Furthermore, the author makes a systematic inquiry into select trials to shed light on a highly complex - and at times contradictory - legal and jurisprudential legacy of Allied war crimes prosecutions.

Religion And Nationalism In Southeast AsiaReligion And Nationalism In Southeast Asia by Liow Chinyoung, Joseph

Religion and nationalism are two of the most potent and enduring forces that have shaped the modern world. Yet, there has been little systematic study of how these two forces have interacted to provide powerful impetus for mobilization in Southeast Asia, a region where religious identities are as strong as nationalist impulses. At the heart of many religious conflicts in Southeast Asia lies competing conceptions of nation and nationhood, identity and belonging, and loyalty and legitimacy. In this accessible and timely study, Joseph Liow examines the ways in which religious identity nourishes collective consciousness of a people who see themselves as a nation, perhaps even as a constituent part of a nation, but anchored in shared faith. Drawing on case studies from across the region, Liow argues that this serves both as a vital element of identity and a means through which issues of rights and legitimacy are understood.

Everyday Political Economy Of Southeast AsiaEveryday Political Economy Of Southeast Asia by Elias, Juanita; Lena Rethel (Eds.)

In this empirically rich collection of essays, a team of leading international scholars explore the way that economic transformation is sustained and challenged by everyday practices across Southeast Asia. Drawing together a body of interdisciplinary scholarship, the authors explore how the emergence of more marketized forms of economic policy-making in Southeast Asia impacts everyday life. The book's twelve chapters address topics such as domestic migration, trade union politics in Myanmar, mining in the Philippines, halal food in Singapore, Islamic finance in Malaysia, education reform in Indonesia, street vending in Malaysia, regional migration between Malaysia, Indonesia and Cambodia, and Southeast Asian domestic workers in Hong Kong. This collection not only enhances understandings of the everyday political economies at work in specific Southeast Asian sites, but makes a major theoretical contribution to the development of an everyday political economy approach in which perspectives from developing economies and non-Western actors are taken seriously.

Transit For BeginnersTransit For Beginners by Rheea Mukherjee

The blurring of truth and the ready acceptance of lies as two strangers meet in Changi International Airport. A teenager living with her disabled mother discovers her own sexuality and ambition in the unlikeliest way. A girl tells us of her first love, and why it will never see a future. The neglected housewife of an artist dishes out more than just delicious food to feel loved. A man battles against his own moral code and his hunger for life. Just a few of the stories that reexamine lives in South East Asia and allow bizarre urban hallucinations to float into the most mundane moments.

Lontar #7: The Journal Of Southeast Asian Speculative Fiction by Lundberg, Jason Erik Et Al (Eds.)

This seventh issue of LONTAR presents speculative writing from and about Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Laos, the Philippines, Indonesia and Korea. Inside these pages, you'll find: a remembrance of ghostbusters disguised as lion dancers by Zen Cho; the subversive power of jazz in a future North Vietnam by TR Napper; a cautionary tale of writing one's perfect lover into existence by Vida Cruz; an expedition to hunt a supernatural tiger in colonial Singapore by Manish Melwani; the relationship between death and a mysterious delivery truck by James Penha; a fateful meeting of the last two Eurasians in Singapore by Melissa De Silva; a critical appreciation of the novels of Eka Kurniawan by Tiffany Tsao; a comic on schoolyard bullying and redemption by Elvin Ching; and speculative poetry from Bryan Thao Worra, Zeny May Recidoro, Brandon Marlon, Subashini Navaratnam, Russ Hoe, Christina Sng, Desmond Kon Zhicheng-Mingdé, Cyril Wong. LONTAR is the world's only biannual literary journal focusing on Southeast Asian speculative fiction. Its many contributors have won major literary awards in Singapore, USA, UK, Taiwan, Japan and the Philippines.

Reframing Modernism: Painting From Southeast Asia, Europe And BeyondReframing Modernism: Painting From Southeast Asia, Europe And Beyond by Lee, Sarah; Sara Siew

What is modernism in Southeast Asia? What is modern art, as embodied in the paintings of Southeast Asia? These questions and more are answered in Reframing Modernism: Painting from Southeast Asia, Europe and Beyond, published in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name. Featuring 217 works, in full colour, by 51 Southeast Asian and European artists, from the Centre Pompidou and National Gallery Singapore, as well as other Southeast Asian collections in the region and beyond, this catalogue tells the compelling story of modernism as it developed across continents, and reveals artists' powerful, and sometimes surprising, responses to modernity.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2016 #14: Learning Diplomacy: Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar And Vietnam Diplomats In AseanTrends In Southeast Asia 2016 #14: Learning Diplomacy: Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar And Vietnam Diplomats In Asean by Deepak Nair

For nearly two decades, ASEAN has served as a vehicle for the postsocialist states of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam (CLMV) to seek diplomatic recognition and enmesh their economies with the dominant discourses, structures, and visions of post-Cold War capitalist modernity. As they pursue modernist state projects, diplomats too must yield to experiences of learning and redefinition to express (and enable) the project of international "integration". This paper examines such processes of learning and redefinition by studying the effects and consequences of immersion in English-based ASEAN multilateral work for the diplomats of CLMV states. The paper demonstrates how stints in ASEAN multilateral diplomacy have emerged as a channel for exposure and grooming for CLMV diplomats as they themselves integrate with an English-based global (yet Eurocentric) diplomacy.

Strengthening Partnership For Regional Sustainable DevelopmentStrengthening Partnership For Regional Sustainable Development by Tran Dai Quang

The Singapore Lecture is designed to provide an opportunity for distinguished statesmen and leaders of thought and knowledge to reach a wider audience in Singapore. The presence of such eminent personalities allows Singaporeans, especially younger executives and decision-makers in both the public and private sectors, the benefit of exposure to leading world figures who address topics of international and regional interest. The 38th Singapore Lecture was delivered by His Excellency Tran Dai Quang, President of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, on 30 August 2016 under the distinguished Chairmanship of Mr Teo Chee Hean, Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security, Singapore.

Reef Fishes Of South-East Asia Including Marine Invertebrates And CoralsReef Fishes Of South-East Asia Including Marine Invertebrates And Corals by Wood, Elizabeth; Michael Aw

A new and updated edition of this popular title. Visitors to South-East Asia are astonished at the profusion of marine life that exists in this biodiversity hot-spot. This concise, easy-to-follow field guide to 270 species of fish, corals and marine invertebrates is an essential companion for anyone interested in this fascinating underwater world, from the casual snorkeller to the most experienced diver. It includes stunning colour photographs of each species, as well as concise and informative text and at-a-glance symbols summarising habitat, diet and behaviour. A visual key to fish families at the start of the book aids the quick location and identification of species.

South-East Asian Soups: Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, CambodiaSouth-East Asian Soups: Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, Cambodia by Tan, Terry

Throughout Southeast Asia, soups and broths are designed to cleanse the mouth and refresh the palate. Bowls of steaming broth are often served alongside the main course, so that diners can slurp a spoonful of soup in between spoonfuls of rice or the main dish. This book features an appetizing range of recipes from Thailand and China, through Japan and Korea, down to the south-east Asian islands of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. You may choose to serve any of the soups solo, as a light lunch or supper dish, or as a prelude to a dinner party - but whenever you place them before your guests, these treats are certain to prove popular.

Southeast Asian PlaysSoutheast Asian Plays by Robson, Cheryl; Aubrey Mellor

A unique collection of seven plays by playwrights from countries in South-East Asia, including Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Cambodia. Covering topics as diverse as the global financial crisis, religious faith, the sex trade, corruption, and exploitation, these plays provide insight into the differing concerns of those living in a part of the world that is experiencing profound change.

Artist And Empire: (En)Countering Colonial LegaciesArtist And Empire: (En)Countering Colonial Legacies by Low Sze Wee (Ed.)

Organised by National Gallery Singapore in association with Tate Britain, Artist and Empire: (En)countering Colonial Legacies critically examines the effects of the British Empire through the prism of art. This catalogue accompanying the exhibition underscores the thought-provoking ways in which artist and Empire each affect the other-artists negotiating historical conditions of colonialism in their work, visual representation altering perceptions of the Empire. Essays by exhibition curators and external scholars situate the concept of Empire within broader socio-political discourse, while selected key artworks from the exhibition are paired with curatorial text that illumines concerns underpinning the works. A comprehensive, pull-out timeline spanning the 16th to 20th centuries charts the scope of activities undertaken in the name of the Empire, and contextualises the pursuits of artists from former colonies.

Admiral Matelieff's Singapore And Johor, 1606-1616Admiral Matelieff's Singapore And Johor, 1606-1616 by Borschberg, Peter (Ed.)

Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge (c.1570?1632) was admiral of the Dutch East India Company when it sailed to Asia in 1605 and besieged Portuguese Melaka in 1606 with the help of Malay allies. A massive Portuguese armada then arrived from Goa to fight the Dutch and succeeded in breaking the siege on the Portuguese colony. Throughout this time, Matelieff penned a series of letters in which he provided a candid assessment of trading opportunities and politics in Asia. Admiral Matelieff's Singapore and Johor offers an edited selection of Matelieff's most important writings from this period, focusing on his experience and interest in Singapore and the Straits of Melaka. The rediscovery of Matelieff's writings have helped to reshape the way local history is taught and understood in Singapore and Malaysia, and this collection will be essential to scholars of the region.

Writing The South Seas: Imagining The Nanyang In Chinese And Southeast Asian Postcolonial LiteratureWriting The South Seas: Imagining The Nanyang In Chinese And Southeast Asian Postcolonial Literature by Bernards, Brian

Postcolonial literature in Chinese from the Nanyang, literally the South Seas, examines the history of Chinese migration, localization, and interethnic exchange in Southeast Asia, and offers a rich variety of approaches to identity. Brian Bernards explores why Nanyang encounters, which have been neglected by most literary histories, should be seen as crucial to the national literatures of China and Southeast Asia. He shows how Nanyang, as a literary trope, has been deployed as a platform by mainland and overseas Chinese writers to rethink colonial and national paradigms. Through a collection of diverse voices-from modern Chinese writers like Xu Dishan, Yu Dafu and Lao She to postcolonial Southeast Asian authors from Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand-writers such as Ng Kim Chew, Chia Joo Ming, Pan Yutong, Yeng Pway Ngon, Suchen Christine Lim, Praphatson Sewikun and Fang Siruo-Bernards demonstrates how the Nanyang imagination negotiates the boundaries of national literature as a meaningful postcolonial subject, and speaks to broader conversations in postcolonial and global literature. This book, written from the emerging field of Sinophone Studies, puts the literature of the region in a new light.

Southeast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19Th CenturySoutheast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19Th Century by Tiffin, Sarah

British artists and commentators in the late 18th and early 19th century encoded the twin aspirations of progress and power in images and descriptions of Southeast Asia's ruined Hindu and Buddhist candis, pagodas, wats and monuments. To the British eye, images of the remains of past civilisations allowed, indeed stimulated, philosophical meditations on the rise and decline of entire empires. Ruins were witnesses to the fall, humbling and disturbingly prophetic, (and so revealing more about British attitudes than they do about Southeast Asia's cultural remains). This important study of a highly appealing but relatively neglected body of work adds multiple dimensions to the history of art and image production in Britain of the period, showing how the anxieties of empire were encoded in the genre of landscape paintings and prints.

Malayan Affair, TheMalayan Affair, The by Holley, Rob

In order to escape a dry marriage to Stuart, a stiff-necked, uncongenial rubber planter in 1930s Kelantan in British Malaya, Valerie Mitchell instigates an adulterous affair with her Muslim chauffeur, Osman. Osman is already married to Minah and knows what he is doing is wrong, but he struggles to spurn the advances of this seductive white woman as she offers herself up to him at the plantation bungalow. Valerie falls pregnant and takes the unprecedented step of leaving her husband, converting to Islam and going to live with Osman in his village, but neither she nor Osman is prepared for such a clash of lives, cultures and religions. The Sultan is displeased and the village headman is at a loss what to do. When the baby is born with Stuart s ginger hair and no obvious Malay features, Osman and the villagers are outraged and the resident bomoh (shaman) suspects evil forces at play and declares the baby has the devil within. Valerie leaves the village in disgrace, abandons her newborn at a Eurasian orphanage and soon finds herself spurned by both the Malay society she had hoped to adopt and British colonial society in Kuala Lumpur and Singapore which she has brought shame upon through her scandalous betrayal of British decorum.