Hong Kong

Featured Titles
Burning Lake, TheBurning Lake, The by Hart, Jonathan Locke

In this book of poetry, Jonathan Locke Hart explores in a contemporary context the divine and human comedy, taking his inspiration from Dante.

Sheriff Of Wan Chai: How An Englishman Helped Govern Hong Kong In Its Last Decades As A British ColonySheriff Of Wan Chai: How An Englishman Helped Govern Hong Kong In Its Last Decades As A British Colony by Mann, Peter

In 1976, Peter Mann left a gloomy England for the last corner of the British empire: Hong Kong. As a police inspector, he commanded a sub-unit and led a district vice squad in Kowloon, before joining the colonial government's Administrative Service and working in the fields of transport, housing, security, environment and tourism. He also served as District Officer for Wan Chai. From raids on gambling dens to organising Governors' visits, his work involved him in all levels of Hong Kong society. Mann's memoir is an anecdotal, historical and racy account of Hong Kong's last decades as a British colony and the colourful story of a young Englishman in the twilight of empire.

Collected Hong Kong StoriesCollected Hong Kong Stories by David T. K. Wong

For an arresting mosaic of the great and complex metropolis known as Hong Kong - and an insight into what the people of the city live by and die for - a reader need look no further than the Collected Hong Kong Stories of David T. K. Wong. Wong, a native son of this once British Crown Colony and now Special Administrative Region of China, has drawn upon his own experiences as a journalist, educator, government official and businessman to assemble a range of memorable characters for his tales. They range from barmen to labourers, from jockeys to expatriate bureaucrats, from scholars to tycoons, and each is infused with insights into the collective soul of the edgy, anomalous and perplexing place he finds himself. These 18 stories are carefully crafted in the grand tradition of O. Henry, Maugham and Saki. Each has been individually published in a magazine or broadcast over radio in Britain, the United States, Hong Kong or elsewhere. They can be dipped into and savoured separately or feasted upon all in one go. Either way, the result can only be satisfying.

How To Hong Kong: An Illustrated Travel JournalHow To Hong Kong: An Illustrated Travel Journal by Lena Sin; Nicholas Tay

In this joyful travel sketchbook, Hong Kong is captured through the hearts of a writer and an artist. From the winding, incense-filled streets of Sheung Wan to the pandemonium of a wet market in North Point to the sleepy island backwater of Tai O, Lena Sin and Nicholas Tay take you on a wonder-filled journey that shines a light on the softer, more romantic side of this chaotic city. Filled with tales of growing up in Hong Kong, Lena weaves personal anecdotes and conversations with locals with richly-illustrated watercolours and photographs by herself and artist husband Nicholas. The result is an intimate portrait of a city that is at once vibrant and energetic as well as charming and nostalgic.

Beyond BrightnessBeyond Brightness by Sarman, Sanja

A succession of tales where characters, many of whom are both somber and ridiculous, have the sinews of their will cut by the knife of fate, or desire. Sarman occasionally seems to be arguing that these phenomena come down to one and the same thing; adducing sentiment as proof. Just as the carbon found in diamonds comes from the living and the dead alike, so dreams, lapses of thought, involuntary visions and sheer boredom are indiscriminately transformed into the gemstone of the special kind of feeling Sarman capitalizes on - a feeling which, if it had a name, would be love of fate. Although the characters are curiously individuated, the center stage in this book is occupied by Sarman's lyrical voice, shot through and through with mystical pain, and the same stubbornly immature longing which characterized Leopardi's "rage to live" in this desert we call the world.

Curveball: Life Never Comes At You StraightCurveball: Life Never Comes At You Straight by Preller, Gustav

What Thomas Bland, formerly senior manager, now plain senior, expects upon his retirement in the seaside city of Durban isn't remotely what he gets. His wife, Caro, leaves him and he loses his friends through betrayal, illness and murder. All the while, socio-political storm clouds are gathering over South Africa. Tom gets caught up in events bigger than he could have ever imagined, and he has to fight for his life and love. The author skilfully sets a small, tightly knit group of characters within a philosophical and moral framework, against a background of a corrupt country sliding out of control.

Black Tortoise WinterBlack Tortoise Winter by Pearson, Jan

Near the end of a twitchy year, as China opens its doors to foreign investment and Hong Kong ponders its future, Pearl Green returns on the same day that Marcus Brown arrives on a mission to set up an investment project to benefit his affluent Native American Indian community in Florida, America. Pearl is back to resume management of The June Bowen Foundation and takes up temporary residence in The Hilton Hotel. Marcus, uneasy about his first trip overseas, also checks in to The Hilton and is about to enjoy his first meal in Hong Kong when he is approached by a conman, Terry Shaw, who begins laying the foundations for carrying out a scheme to relieve Marcus of his people's investment funds. The following day, Marcus's sense of unease turns to panic when he is framed for a murder which takes place in the hotel, that of the wealthy business tycoon Dennis Childs, the father of one of Pearl's friends - the famous Belinda Jones, celebrity wife of rock legend Smut Jones. Whilst Marcus languishes in a prison cell, Belinda returns to bury her father and disappears from The Hilton while on her way to visit Pearl. Peter Benson, concerned that Pearl is somehow central to Belinda's kidnapping, consults Pearl's father. When James Gates announces that he will be in Hong Kong during the first week of winter and old friend Yip Yee Koon - whose own networks are humming - warns her to be on the alert, Pearl knows that the atmosphere described by Yip as a state of strangeness means that trouble has arrived in Hong Kong. It takes all the qualities that the mythological turtle can harness - wisdom and the valour of a warrior - for James, Pearl, Peter Benson and Yip Yee Koon to overcome the criminal forces that enter their lives in this dark and dangerous winter - a Black Tortoise Winter.

Adam's FranchiseAdam's Franchise by Gray, Lawrence

In the land of Daoistan, freedom has arrived at last. The revolution liberated all, then enslaved everyone, and now it was liberating them again by allowing people to own credit cards. And a man with credit is a man who has the world at his fingertips, or at least a trip into town where the temptations are pretty much as they have always been, only more people can afford them. Adam's Franchise is a story about Adam and his Franchise. He is not quite sure what that means, but he is a modern man, embracing the economic miracle and taking up a gift shop franchise at a new hotel. There he will sell much the same things that he always sold: baskets, pots, cultural artefacts of various kinds, except at a modern price to foreigners, should they ever care to come to the hotel. The desert that he lives in is not the most beautiful of places, policed by Omar who has to learn how to get out of his hammock, fuelled by Castrol who just loves the smell of petrol and the visions it gives him, and terrorised by nomads and Adam's volatile brothers-in-law. But if it ever rids itself of the last vestiges of barbarism, both pre-revolutionary and revolutionary, as epitomised by Adam's indolent, lustful, embittered, rapacious, cynical, superstitious father, Saleem, then harmony - both spiritual and economic -might assert itself. Or maybe, just air-conditioning. Daoistan exists everywhere, or has done at some time or other. And there have been many Adams.

Halfway Up A Hill: Stories From Hong KongHalfway Up A Hill: Stories From Hong Kong by Morton, T. A.

In Halfway up a Hill, an array of characters from the eight distinctive short stories converge and interact in and around a busy Soho coffee shop in Hong Kong. In the air-conditioned confines of an unassuming coffee shop halfway up (or down, depending on your point of view) a steep Hong Kong hillside, a multitude of lives entwine, unravel and spin off, together and apart, all watched over and influenced by forces the people involved only vaguely apprehend-as well as observed by the benign spirits that occupy the shop bathroom. The collection of intriguing stories told in Halfway Up A Hill both stimulate and beguile, like a sip of hot coffee on a cold day.

Fishing In Hong Kong: A How-To Guide To Making The Most Of The Territory's Shores, Reservoirs And Surrounding WatersFishing In Hong Kong: A How-To Guide To Making The Most Of The Territory's Shores, Reservoirs And Surrounding Waters by Sharp, Mike; John Peters; Lizzie Sharp-Eliazar

Did you leave your fishing rods at home before relocating to Hong Kong, unaware that such a densely populated place could support recreational fishing? Mike Sharp and John Peters walk you through the local angling spots and describe key tactics normally known only by Hong Kong anglers. Carp fishing, pier fishing, and trolling for game fish are just some of the topics covered in a warm, descriptive text beautifully illustrated by Lizzie Sharp-Eliazar. Whether you live in a skyscraper or a village, this book will encourage you to get out onto the territory's beautiful waters or rocky shore and cast a line - in the hope that the next one will be the one that didn't get away.

Landscapes Lost And Found: Appreciating Hong Kong's Heritage And Cultural LandscapesLandscapes Lost And Found: Appreciating Hong Kong's Heritage And Cultural Landscapes by Nicolson, Ken

Hong Kong's approach to heritage conservation has focused mainly on saving an old building here and there with little or no regard to its surroundings. Recent public debates challenging proposals to demolish the former Central Government Offices have highlighted this problem and, for the first time, acknowledged that the heritage value of the buildings is enhanced by their contribution to the broader 'cultural landscape' of Government Hill. Not all of Hong Kong's heritage cultural landscapes have been so fortunate. This book illustrates the concept of cultural landscape using wonderful local examples and champions this new approach to interpreting and conserving Hong Kong's heritage sites more effectively.

Lui Che-Woo: Creating Value, The Journey Of A Self-Made Billionaire - The Authorized BiographyLui Che-Woo: Creating Value, The Journey Of A Self-Made Billionaire - The Authorized Biography by Lui Che Woo; Ba Yajun

Hong-Kong-based multi-billionaire Lui Che-woo started his first enterprise in difficult circumstances at the age of 13. Now, after more than 70 years in business, he has achieved great success in numerous industries. Throughout his life and career, Lui has faced many challenges and experienced numerous ups and downs. What makes drives Lui? What makes his business empire successful and outstanding? In this book he shares his wisdom, unveils the secrets of his triumphs and pathways to happiness, and inspires readers to change their thinking and improve their lives.

Wkw: The Cinema Of Wong Kar WaiWkw: The Cinema Of Wong Kar Wai by Wong Kar Wai; John Powers

The long-awaited retrospective from the internationally renowned film director celebrated for his visually lush and atmospheric films. Wong Kar Wai is known for his romantic and stylish films that explore - in saturated, cinematic scenes - themes of love, longing, and the burden of memory. His style reveals a fascination with mood and texture, and a sense of place figures prominently. In this volume, the first on his entire body of work, Wong Kar Wai and writer John Powers explore Wong's complete oeuvre in the locations of some of his most famous scenes. The book is structured as six conversations between Powers and Wong. Discussing each of Wong's eleven films, the conversations also explore Wong's trademark themes of time, nostalgia, and beauty, and their roots in his personal life.

Dillon Zooms To Hong KongDillon Zooms To Hong Kong by Hewitt, Jo; Kenny Wong (Illus.)

In Hong Kong Dillon meets his friendly guide, Ken. Together they explore the little streets, shops, temples, restaurants and much more.

Blue Moment, TheBlue Moment, The by Jacquet-Lagreze, Romain

After his success of Vertical Horizon in 2012 and Wild Concrete in 2014, Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze is back with a whole new concept of photographing Hong Kong. By scouting to different elevated vantage points over two summers, the photographer captures the mesmerizing beauty of Hong Kong's urban landscape at dusk, enveloped by a deep blue haze. Through his lens, the densely packed buildings are presented with a magical touch, surprising readers with a new perspective of documenting Hong Kong's cityscape.

Shifting SandsShifting Sands by Deepa Vanjani

Shifting Sands is Dr Deepa Vanjani's debut poetry collection. She speaks of urbanisation and the loss of natural surroundings, the trap of illusions we humans are caught in, the lack of depth in relationships. But she also speaks of love, nature and the spiritual traces that lead us to the centre. For the author herself, many of the poems are life lessons and a humble offering to the Big Buddha of Lantau.

Princess FlowerPrincess Flower by Erkek, Hasan

Princess Flower is the first English translation of a play originally written and performed in Turkish in Turkey. Children of eight years old and over will enjoy reading and acting this prize-winning play, which teaches children that girls are just as capable as boys, and that men and women can work together again in the flower fields and elsewhere.

Of Leaves & Ashes (With Cd)Of Leaves & Ashes (With Cd) by Ho, Patty

This collection of poems include some relate to philosophy and some to old Chinese poems to which Patty Ho has added new thoughts. Others are more musical and are additionally presented on the accompanying CD as songs. Patty Ho's essay 'A solitary song for nothing', which concludes the book, discusses poetry and philosophy.

Irreverent Poems For Pretentious PeopleIrreverent Poems For Pretentious People by Hoeg, Henrik

This is an eclectic collection of poems that range from sardonically humorous to genuinely moving. The collection plays fast and loose with both language and form as it explores, among other things, linguistics, history, relationships and the absurd. Henrik Hoeg's first published collection, it was awarded a publication prize in the competition for the International Proverse Prize 2015.

Dragon's Back, The: A Story From Hong KongDragon's Back, The: A Story From Hong Kong by Whittington, Theadora

Chinese fung shui tells us there is a dragon inhabiting every green valley, protective of the mountains and its route to the sea. Hiking into the hills of Hong Kong for a weekend picnic, Luke and his parents suddenly find their path blocked by a forest fire. Can the friendly mountain dragon help? Or is the mythical creature equally at risk from the actions of careless human beings? With original painted art, and a cut-out dragon for children to make themselves, The Dragon's Back sends a gentle message of caring for the environment.