Politics & Economics

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Controlled Chaos: Essays On Malaysia's New Politics Beyond Mahathirism And The Multimedia Super CorridorControlled Chaos: Essays On Malaysia's New Politics Beyond Mahathirism And The Multimedia Super Corridor by Rahman, Azly

Through this collection of essays on Malaysia's "new politics", Azly Rahman once again provides a superb insight into contemporary Malaysian political narratives. Azly poses a series of questions to the reader to think critically about issues concerning Obama-ism, Hudud, censorship and the institutionalization of Islam.

Politics Of The Temporary: An Ethnography Of Migrant Life In Urban MalaysiaPolitics Of The Temporary: An Ethnography Of Migrant Life In Urban Malaysia by Parthiban Muniandy

For more than three decades Malaysia's economic growth has been driven in part by the skills and sweat of large numbers of migrant workers. The country has become the temporary home for more than two million documented migrants. Many more than that are undocumented, living precarious lives on the margins of society. Politics of the Temporary details the rich, complex and often difficult realities of the lives of migrants in Malaysia. Through a series of reflective and critical ethnographic notes - and told in the words of migrants themselves - it provides an intimate examination of the many ways that migrants adapt to life in the city, their innovative strategies for coping with pressures of work and discrimination, and their capacity to forge new networks and build informal communities.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #10 - Establishing Infrastructure Projects: Priorities For by Larkin, Stuart

The issue of establishing infrastructure projects for Myanmar's industrial development is addressed in two parts. Part I focuses on the role of the private sector, how Myanmar's conglomerates can take the lead on infrastructure development with financing from the new China-led multilateral development banks. Part II focuses on the role of the state. The government needs to work closely with the conglomerates and also adopt measures and policies that will facilitate this model of infrastructure development. For Myanmar's policy decision-makers a blind act of faith in free markets alone to deliver the prosperity that the country seeks the Washington consensus model is unlikely to be sufficient to bring about the structural change in the economy necessary to bring about sustained development. The more interventionist approach characterized by the developmental state, with its long pedigree among successful Asian economies, is far more likely to deliver the necessary results. For Myanmar the formula is the president works closely with the conglomerates to establish a pipeline of shovel-ready projects, with the necessary concessions assigned, in time to tap the new China-led multilateral development banks in their initial splurge of project lending.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #09 - Establishing Infrastructure Projects: Priorities For Myanmar's Industrial Development - Part I: The Role Of The Private Sector by Larkin, Stuart

The issue of establishing infrastructure projects for Myanmar's industrial development is addressed in two parts. Part I focuses on the role of the private sector, how Myanmar's conglomerates can take the lead on infrastructure development with financing from the new China-led multilateral development banks. Part II focuses on the role of the state. The government needs to work closely with the conglomerates and also adopt measures and policies that will facilitate this model of infrastructure development.Once Myanmar's tycoons fully take on board the new financing options available with the creation of the two new China-led multilateral development banks they could once again become more engaged with the domestic political class, particularly over the 2015 election period with its prospect of a change in the power configuration. They would have had several years of working on improving the operations of existing businesses, necessary for their continued prosperity under the more competitive economic conditions of the new Myanmar. But this experience will only serve to sharpen their yearning for doing the really big deals associated with operating infrastructure concessions where a very large scale, and an earnings stream shielded from competition for many years to come, are in prospect. The private sector should indeed take the lead in Myanmar's overall economic development. After all, Ne Wins socialism was a severe wrong turn for the country, largely responsible for leaving the country where it is now. But the secret source of the prosperous market economy could well be paradoxically a strong state. Talented political leadership and an established trend of strengthening state capacity, is necessary to utilize the power of private enterprise.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #08 - Johor Survey: Attitudes Towards Governance And Economy Iskandar Malaysia, And Singapore by Chong, Terence

These are selected findings from a survey on Johor residents commissioned by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS). The survey was conducted with 2,009 respondents between October and November 2013. The big picture painted by the findings is one of interethnic dissonance, especially between ethnic Malays and Chinese in the state of Johor. More than income or education, ethnicity seemed to be the key determinant of how certain questions were answered in this survey. With regard to satisfaction with the performance of state and federal government, ethnic Chinese respondents were more likely to be dissatisfied with the government's performance to date compared with their Malay and Indian counterparts. Interethnic dissonance is also evident in the political and economic outlook of respondents. With regard to Iskandar Malaysia, although the majority of all respondents said they were satisfied with its developments, Chinese respondents were the least likely to say so. Chinese and Indian respondents were more likely to have a favourable opinion of Singapore and were more open to visiting and working in the city-state. In terms of ethnic affinity across the Causeway, Malay, Chinese, and Indian respondents in Johor did not see similarities between themselves and their ethnic counterparts in Singapore.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #07 - China's Economic Engagement With Southeast Asia - Singapore by Lee, John

China is a relatively minor source of FDI into Singapore and pales in comparison to FDI from advanced economies in North America and the EU. This will remain the case for the foreseeable future despite recent agreements facilitating Chinese firms and capital entering into Singapore, and which reduce the transaction costs of doing so. Firms from China are also a relatively small investor in the critical Singaporean Financial & Insurance Services sector. When it comes to the foreign portfolio investment (FPI) which helps provide liquidity and capital for Singaporean listed firms, China is a miniscule player. Assets of Chinese banks make up a very small percentage of the assets of the very open banking sector in Singapore. The bottom line is that Singapore's standing and status as one of the worlds leading and most attractive financial centres prevents Singapore from being over-reliant on any one financial partner; and Singapore is certainly not over-reliant on China.

Old War, New Methods: The Fight Against Terror by Murugaian, Nirmala

Since the horrific Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in 2001, there has been no whiff of a solution to problems posed by terrorist and extremist groups. They seize headlines with their acts of savagery against common people. The threats posed by the Al-Qaeda-inspired group, the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS), show that terrorism is still a serious security threat. In this dangerous and complex landscape, what must be done to eradicate the toxic appeal of radicals who spread their ideology of hate and violence? This book contains: gripping accounts of encounters with terrorists; insightful discussions on torture versus persuasive interrogation, the brainwashing tactics of extremists and more; and multi-faceted approach on battling terrorism, such as promoting multiracial and multicultural harmony at the ground level, and staying ahead of terrorists in making use of technology. This book features anti-terrorism experts from fields as diverse as security experts and Muslim clerics. They offer answers to important questions on ways of battling terrorism. Drawn from an award-winning series in The Straits Times, this is a must-have compilation for officials and laymen interested in the fight against extremism.

South China Sea And The Struggle For Power In Asia, TheSouth China Sea And The Struggle For Power In Asia, The by Hayton, Bill

China's rise has upset the global balance of power, and the first place to feel the strain is Beijing's backyard: the South China Sea. This important book makes clear sense of the South Sea disputes. Bill Hayton, a journalist with extensive experience in the region, examines the high stakes involved for rival nations that include Vietnam, India, Taiwan, the Philippines, and China, as well as the United States, Russia and others. Hayton also lays out the daunting obstacles that stand in the way of peaceful resolution. The author critiques various claims and positions, overturns conventional wisdom, and outlines what the future may hold for this clamorous region of international rivalry.

Malaysians Boleh?Malaysians Boleh? by Dean Johns

This is a compilation of excellent socio-political commentaries on Malaysia from Dean Johns' weekly columns for Malaysiakini.com.

Affirmative Action Or Discrimination? A Comparative Study Of Higher Education In The Us And MalaysiaAffirmative Action Or Discrimination? A Comparative Study Of Higher Education In The Us And Malaysia by Kong Wee Cheng

Preferential treatment policy has been in place in the US and Malaysia for over a few decades. What are the consequences of preferential treatment in higher education in the two countries? Have this preferential policy achieved its initial goals? How do members of the beneficiary and non-beneficiary groups respond to it? This book addresses the origins including the political implications of preferential policy in Malaysia and the US. It seeks an in depth understanding of the consequences of the policy.

Ethnic Relations In Malaysia: Harmony & Conflict (New Edition)Ethnic Relations In Malaysia: Harmony & Conflict (New Edition) by Syed Husin Ali

With Malaysia in the throes of sweeping political change, academic turned political activist Dr Syed Husin Ali traces how ethnicity has been manipulated, since Independence, by Malaysian politicians for their own gain to the detriment of the masses. He dissects the origins, fallacies and destructive nature of ethnic politics in Malaysia and examines the issue of class versus ethnicity or race. It is time, he argues, for an end torace or ethnic-based politics. In this new edition, the author has updated the book in terms of facts and events, and included two more articles.

Little Red Dot, The: Reflections Of Foreign Ambassadors On Singapore - Vol. IiiLittle Red Dot, The: Reflections Of Foreign Ambassadors On Singapore - Vol. Iii by Koh, Tommy; Chang Li Lin; Joanna Koh (Eds.)

The first two volumes of The Little Red Dot series covered a wide range of views about Singapore's diplomacy by Singaporean diplomats. This new addition to the series will offer a complementary perspective of Singapore and its bilateral relations, through the eyes of past heads of missions from foreign countries who have served in Singapore or were responsible for Singapore. The reader will be able to glean insights from the foreign diplomats who took an active role in getting to know Singapore, and at the same time, also worked hard to promote their respective countries' interests.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #06 - The South China Sea And China-Asean Relations by Zhao Hong

From the late 1990s up to until recently, China's approach to Southeast Asia and various territorial and maritime disputes was to engage in "good neighbour policy" and bilateral negotiations. In the recent years, however, Beijing's actions have somewhat departed from this broadly benign approach. For China, energy security and maritime development are the main considerations. Moreover, China's maritime capabilities are growing rapidly, including maritime law enforcement, military power projection and offshore drilling. As tensions in the South China Sea increases, external players such as the U.S., India and Japan have become increasingly involved in the territorial dispute. Consequently, the issue has gone beyond territorial claims and access to energy resources, as the South China Sea has become a focal point for rivalry among the big powers. This makes the dispute more complicated and dangerous, arousing concerns that the development of China-ASEAN relations will be affected.

Panorama 02/2014: Europe - Surging AheadPanorama 02/2014: Europe - Surging Ahead by Hofmeister, Wilhelm (Ed.)

In this issue, authors from different European countries analyze the European integration and the European Union. There are dedicated to topics like the elections to the European Parliament, the Asia Europe Meeting (ASEM) of leaders from both continents in October 2014 in Milan, Italy, as well as the cooperation between the two regions in security affairs.

Chinese Rules by Clissold, Tim

From the author of the acclaimed Mr. China comes another rollicking adventure story-part memoir, part history, part business imbroglio-that offers valuable lessons to help Westerners win in China. In the 21st century, the world has tilted eastwards in its orbit; China grows confident while the West seems mired in doubt. Having lived and worked in China for more than two decades, Tim Clissold explains the secrets that Westerners can use to navigate through its cultural and political maze. Picking up where he left off in the international bestseller Mr. China, Chinese Rules chronicles his most recent exploits, with assorted Chinese bureaucrats, factory owners, and local characters building a climate change business in China. Of course, all does not go as planned as he finds himself caught between the world's largest carbon emitter and the world's richest man. Clissold offers entertaining and enlightening anecdotes of the absurdities, gaffes, and mysteries he encountered along the way. Sprinkled amid surreal scenes of cultural confusion and near misses, are smart myth-busting insights and practical lessons Westerns can use to succeed in China. Exploring key episodes in that nation's long political, military, and cultural history, Clissold outlines five Chinese Rules, which anyone can deploy in on-the-ground situations with modern Chinese counterparts. These Chinese rules will enable foreigners not only to cooperate with China but also to compete with it on its own terms.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #05: Vietnam: Straddling Southeast Asia's DivideTrends In Southeast Asia 2014 #05: Vietnam: Straddling Southeast Asia's Divide by Huong Le Thu

Some analysts see Southeast Asia dividing into continental and maritime sub-groups, largely due to great power rivalry. This paper seeks to address the implications of this division for Vietnam. Sustaining positive bilateral relations with China has been challenging for Vietnam because of the asymmetry of power between the two neighbours. Relations with Beijing have a determining effect on Vietnam's foreign policy, ties with other regional actors and its position in the Southeast Asian divide. Improved ties with the U.S. provide Vietnam a counterbalance against China. Despite good prospects for Hanoi-Washington relations, the sensitive issues of human rights and democratisation remain obstacles.

Future Of Asean, TheFuture Of Asean, The by Hassanal Bolkiah

On 22 April 2014, the 34th Singapore Lecture was delivered by His Majesty Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Muizzaddin Waddaulah, Sultan and Yang Di-Pertuan of Brunei Darussalam.

Big Ideas Of Lee Kuan Yew, The by Jayakumar, Shashi; Rahul Sagar

Lee Kuan Yew was born in 1923, a time when Singapore was under British rule. After experiencing the Japanese Occupation of Singapore, he travelled to England to study Law. Mr Lee's legal career in Singapore was marked by increasing political involvement. Together with a group of like-minded individuals, he formed the People's Action Party (PAP) in 1954. Following the PAP's victory in the 1959 Legislative Assembly general elections, Mr Lee became the first Prime Minister of Singapore, at the age of 35. He held this position until 1990. After stepping down from the premiership, he remained in the Cabinet until 2011, serving as Senior Minister and subsequently as Minister Mentor. Mr Lee oversaw Singapore's transformation from a Third World country to a First World country. This remarkable achievement has long prompted admiration and debate. This volume makes a distinctive contribution to our understanding of Mr Lee's legacy because for the first time the men and women who worked closely with him have come together to discuss his ideas. The resulting essays shed valuable light on a wide range of topics including law and politics, society and economics, and governance and foreign affairs.

Let The People Have Him: Chiam See Tong, The Early YearsLet The People Have Him: Chiam See Tong, The Early Years by Loke Hoe Yeong

Based on extensive interviews, family documents and party archives, Let the People Have Him is the first biography of an opposition politician from post-independence Singapore-a biography of a man who, through his accomplishments and devotion, struggled to build a fairer, more balanced and diverse country.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2014 #04: Reforms Will Determine Degree Of Vietnam's Dependence On ChinaTrends In Southeast Asia 2014 #04: Reforms Will Determine Degree Of Vietnam's Dependence On China by Lee, John

Defined by its geography, the troubled history between the two countries, and the huge asymmetry of power, Vietnam pursues a counter-dominance strategy towards China even as it adopts a softly-softly diplomatic approach with its northern neighbour. While China has emerged as Vietnam's largest trading partner by volume and Vietnamese dependency on Chinese imports is growing, deeper analysis of the nature and structure of trade between the two countries suggests that China's capacity to use trade to enhance its strategic leverage over Vietnam is far more restricted than is often assumed.