Politics & Economics

Featured Titles
Singapore Perspectives 2018 - TogetherSingapore Perspectives 2018 - Together by Gee, Christopher; Y. Arivalagan & Fq Chao (Eds.)

Singapore is one of the most rapidly ageing societies in the world. This book is a collection of speeches presented at Singapore Perspectives 2018 by leading thought leaders and eminent speakers on how our economic, political and social institutions can best adapt to and manage a rapidly ageing population. Contributors to this book tackle the urgent need to shape mind-sets, policies and decisions today for the best outcomes for current and future generations.

May 9: People Power Saves Malaysia - Mahathir Leads The WayMay 9: People Power Saves Malaysia - Mahathir Leads The Way by Krishnamoorthy, M.

May 9 was a significant day for all Malaysians. It heralded a new landscape - economic, social and political - for the citizens. This book is a fascinating read that is retold through the inner stirrings of a young boy, an unfortunate victim of a "business as usual" corrupt system that poses a serious threat to the nation's economy. In the face of rising costs and unemployment, the boy yearned for a change. Will tomorrow ever come? By sharing glimpses from the innocent lenses of a child, the author has painted a stark contrast of childlike simplicity with the world of grown-ups that is consumed by greed and glittering gems. It captures the journey of a nation that has witnessed the most dramatic trajectories of greed and power.

Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, And The Malaysian StateConstituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, And The Malaysian State by Moustafa, Tamir

Most Muslim-majority countries have legal systems that enshrine both Islam and liberal rights. While not necessarily at odds, these dual commitments nonetheless provide legal and symbolic resources for activists to advance contending visions for their states and societies. Using the case study of Malaysia, Constituting Religion examines how these legal arrangements enable litigation and feed the construction of a 'rights-versus-rites binary' in law, politics, and the popular imagination. By drawing on extensive primary source material and tracing controversial cases from the court of law to the court of public opinion, this study theorizes the 'judicialization of religion' and the radiating effects of courts on popular legal and religious consciousness. The book documents how legal institutions catalyze ideological struggles, which stand to redefine the nation and its politics. Probing the links between legal pluralism, social movements, secularism, and political Islamism, Constituting Religion sheds new light on the confluence of law, religion, politics, and society.

Constraining Elites In Russia And Indonesia: Political Participation And Regime SurvivalConstraining Elites In Russia And Indonesia: Political Participation And Regime Survival by Lussier, Danielle N.

This is a thought-provoking analysis on why democracy succeeds in some countries but not others, comparing the post-transition experiences of two cases of contemporary democratisation: Russia and Indonesia. Following authoritarian regimes, democracy eroded in Russia but flourished in Indonesia - so confounding dominant theories of democratisation that predicted the opposite outcomes based on their levels of socioeconomic development and histories of statehood. Identifying key behaviours and patterns of political participation as a factor, Lussier interweaves ethnographic interview and quantitative public opinion data to expand our understanding on how mass political participation contributes to a democracy's survival. The integration of both micro- and macro-level data in a single study is one of this project's most significant contributions, and will enhance its appeal to both researchers and instructors.

Authoritarian Capitalism: Sovereign Wealth Funds And State-Owned Enterprises In East Asia And BeyondAuthoritarian Capitalism: Sovereign Wealth Funds And State-Owned Enterprises In East Asia And Beyond by Moustafa, Tamir

Since 1945, the liberal-democratic model of capitalism spread across the globe, ultimately prevailing over communism. Over the past two decades, a new statist-authoritarian model has begun diffusing across East Asia. Rather than rejecting capitalism, authoritarian leaders harness it to uphold their rule. Based on extensive research of East Asia's largest corporations and sovereign wealth funds, this book argues that the most aggressive version of this model does not belong to China. Rather, it can be found in Malaysia and Singapore. Although these countries are small, the implications are profound because one-third of all countries in the world possess the same type of regime. With an increasing number of these authoritarian regimes establishing sovereign wealth funds, their ability to intervene in the corporate sectors of other countries is rapidly expanding.

South China Sea, The: A Crucible Of Regional Cooperation Or Conflict-Making Sovereignty Claims?South China Sea, The: A Crucible Of Regional Cooperation Or Conflict-Making Sovereignty Claims? by Jenner, C. J.; Tran Truong Thuy

The history of the South China Sea is a catalyst of international cooperation and conflict. Security in the Indo-Asia-Pacific is largely governed by command of these strategic waters. More than half of global shipping transits the South China Sea, which also holds significant reserves of oil, gas and minerals, as well as some of the largest fisheries in the world. Drawing on a team of field-leading researchers, Jenner and Thuy provide an empirical study of the global ocean's most contested sea space. The volume's four parts offer an insightful analysis of the significance of the South China Sea to the international order; sub-national agents of influence on relations between states; the disputes over sovereignty through the analytical prism of international law; and the conflictful region's prospects. The primary source-based conclusion elucidates the agency of history and strategy in the South China Sea.

Civil-Military Relations In Southeast AsiaCivil-Military Relations In Southeast Asia by Croissant, Aurel

Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia reviews the historical origins, contemporary patterns, and emerging changes in civil-military relations in Southeast Asia from colonial times until today. It analyzes what types of military organizations emerged in the late colonial period and the impact of colonial legacies and the Japanese occupation in World War II on the formation of national armies and their role in processes of achieving independence. It analyzes the long term trajectories and recent changes of professional, revolutionary, praetorian and neo-patrimonial civil-military relations in the region. Finally, it analyzes military roles in state- and nation-building; political domination; revolutions and regime transitions; and military entrepreneurship.

Singapore: Identity, Brand, PowerSingapore: Identity, Brand, Power by Tan, Kenneth Paul

Contemporary Singapore is simultaneously a small postcolonial multicultural nation state and a cosmopolitan global city. To manage fundamental contradictions, the state takes the lead in authoring the national narrative. This is partly an internal process of nation building, but it is also achieved through more commercially motivated and outward facing efforts at nation and city branding. Both sets of processes contribute to Singapore's capacity to influence foreign affairs, if only for national self-preservation. For a small state with resource limitations, this is mainly through the exercise of smart power, or the ability to strategically combine soft and hard power resources.

Indonesia: Twenty Years Of DemocracyIndonesia: Twenty Years Of Democracy by Davidson, Jamie S.

This Element argues that after twenty years of democratization, Indonesia has performed admirably. This is especially so when the country's accomplishments are placed in comparative perspective. However, as we analytically focus more closely to inspect Indonesia's political regime, political economy, and how identity-based mobilizations have emerged, it is clear that Indonesia still has many challenges to overcome, some so pressing that they could potentially erode or reverse many of the democratic gains the country has achieved since its former authoritarian ruler, Soeharto, was forced to resign in 1998.

End Of Umno?, The: Essay On Malaysia's Former Dominant Party (New And Expanded Post-Ge14 Ed.)End Of Umno?, The: Essay On Malaysia's Former Dominant Party (New And Expanded Post-Ge14 Ed.) by Welsh, Bridget (Ed.)

What is the future of Malaysia's former dominant party, the United Malays National Organisation or UMNO? With the loss of government in the May 2018 General Election (GE14) after 61 years in government, the party faces a different, more uncertain future. It is grappling with its new role in the national political opposition and continued questions about the leadership of former prime minister Najib Tun Razak. This collection is an expanded edition of the original 2016, The End of UMNO? It includes the original five essays (including the foreword by current Foreign Minister in the Pakatan Harapan government and former UMNO Supreme Council member Saifuddin Abdullah), as well as new post-GE14 epilogue essays by each of the contributors - John Funston, Clive Kessler, James Chin and Bridget Welsh, all prominent and established scholars studying Malaysian politics. It also includes a new foreword by veteran UMNO leader, Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah, who contested for the party presidency in the June 2018 party elections. The contributors in this collection study developments in Malaysia's dominant party, the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO) and discuss the question of whether UMNO is in fact at an end.

New Silk Roads: The Present And The Future Of The WorldNew Silk Roads: The Present And The Future Of The World by Frankopan, Peter

When The Silk Roads was published in 2015, it became an instant classic. A major reassessment of world history, it compelled us to look at the past from a different perspective. The New Silk Roads brings this story up to date, addressing the present and future of a world that is changing dramatically. With brilliant insight, Peter Frankopan takes a fresh look at the network of relationships being formed along the length and breadth of the Silk Roads today, assessing the global reverberations of these continual shifts in the centre of power - all too often absent from headlines in the West.

People's Victory, The: How Malaysians Saved Their CountryPeople's Victory, The: How Malaysians Saved Their Country by Kee Thuan Chye

This book tells the epic story of how Malaysians took responsibility for their country and struggled against the odds to change their government. Of how a 92-year-old former prime minister who had been an enemy of the Opposition for decades crossed over to join forces with the very man he had sent to jail 20 years earlier, and led the charge to topple the party he once loved. Starting with the outcome of the 13th general election in 2013 and then moving through five years of drama, surprises, ironies and twists to the climactic 14th general election of 9 May 2018, the narrative grows from despair to hope to euphoria.

Myanmar Transformed: People, Places And PoliticsMyanmar Transformed: People, Places And Politics by Chambers, Justine; G. Mccarthy Et Al (Eds.)

The triumph of Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy at the 2015 election was supposed to mark the consolidation of a reformist trajectory for Myanmar society. What has followed has not proved so straightforward. This book takes stock of the mutations, continuities and fractures at the heart of today's political and economic transformations. We ask: What has changed under a democratically elected government? Where are the obstacles to reform? And is there scope to foster a more prosperous and inclusive Myanmar? With the peace process faltering, over 1 million people displaced by recent violence, and ongoing army dominance in key areas of decision-making, the chapters in this volume identify areas of possible reform within the constraints of Myanmar's hybrid civil-military governance arrangements.

Anatomy Of An Electoral TsunamiAnatomy Of An Electoral Tsunami by Lim Teck Ghee; S. Thayaparan; Terence Netto

This is a collection of articles by three of Malaysia's most prolific and respected political commentators on the forces which created the historic GE14 result in 2018.

Anand Panyarachun And The Making Of Modern ThailandAnand Panyarachun And The Making Of Modern Thailand by Faulder, Dominic

Based on hundreds of interviews, this is the absorbing story of one of Thailand's most influential figures. Against a backdrop of political coups and violence, Cold War intrigue, and regional conflict, Anand Panyarachun reached the pinnacle of Thailand's foreign service, and twice served as an unelected prime minister. In this comprehensive biography, veteran journalist Dominic Faulder describes Anand's formative years in a still bucolic Bangkok and postwar England, his long tenure in North America as permanent representative to the United Nations and ambassador to the US, his unexpected terms as prime minister, his vital role in the attempt to bring lasting constitutional reform to Thailand, and more.

Dividing Asean And Conquering The South China Sea: China's Financial Power ProjectionDividing Asean And Conquering The South China Sea: China's Financial Power Projection by O'neill, Daniel C.

The "ASEAN Way" is based on the principle of consensus; any individual member state effectively has a veto over any proposal with which it disagrees. Dividing ASEAN and Conquering the South China Sea analyzes how China uses its influence to divide ASEAN countries in order to prevent them from acting collectively to resolve their territorial disputes with China in the South China Sea. Using comparative case studies of China's relations with Cambodia, the Philippines, and Myanmar, O'Neill argues that the regime type in the country with which China is interacting plays an important role in enhancing or constraining China's ability to influence the governments of developing states within ASEAN and globally. Authoritarian institutions facilitate Chinese influence while democratic institutions inhibit that influence.

Philippine Economy, The: No Longer The East Asian Exception?Philippine Economy, The: No Longer The East Asian Exception? by Clarete, Ramon L.; E. F. Esguerra Et Al (Eds.)

In this volume, a leading group of scholars pose the question, has the Philippine economy rejoined the dynamic East Asian mainstream and, if so, what set of policies and priorities are required to maintain the strong economic momentum of recent years? Successive chapters address issues related to growth and poverty, infrastructure and urbanization, education, health, the environment, energy, development finance, and governance and institutions.

Catharsis: A Second Chance For Democracy In MalaysiaCatharsis: A Second Chance For Democracy In Malaysia by Ooi Kee Beng

Malaysia pulled itself back from the brink on 9 May 2018. That day the majority of its voting population decided to topple the Barisan Nasional government that had been in power for over 60 years and that had come to be seen as corrupt beyond redemption, and incompetent to boot. Lined up against the unpopular administration of Najib Razak was a coalition led by former strongman Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, who at the age of 92 had decided to return to Malaysian politics to stop the rot which many believed had begun during his earlier period in power, in 1981-2003. As the oldest prime minister in world history, he is now setting about creating structure that he believes will lead to a Malaysia that will achieve the Vision 2020 that he first propounded in 1991. This compilation of insightful analyses is Ooi Kee Beng's seventh, and discusses key events from the last five years leading up to 9 May 2018 and beyond. These seven books together cover the strange period we may come to know as the Inter-Mahathir Era, and the present volume discusses some of the challenges facing the new government, and the Malaysian population in general, now that the Barisan Nasional has imploded.

Regime Change In Malaysia: Ge14 And The End Of Umno-Bn's 60-Year RuleRegime Change In Malaysia: Ge14 And The End Of Umno-Bn's 60-Year Rule by Loh, Francis; Anil Netto (Eds.)

This book is a collection of 40-plus essays by 30-plus Malaysians about GE14 on 9 May 2018. It is a record of an unprecedented defeat of the UMNO-BN government, in power since 1957, and its replacement by Pakatan Harapan, a newly formed coalition. These essays discuss the major election issues, the principal actors, the campaign, the results and where we might be headed in the next decade. Regardless of the specifics, GE14 has ushered in Regime Change. We are witnessing change that goes beyond the displacement of one government by another as occurs when a different party takes over in western liberal democracies. Regime Change is more than that in at least three aspects: first, there are changes in the make-up of the socio-economic alliance that is backing up the new government; second, we see changes in the major political institutions, as in the whittling down of the humongous Prime Minister's Department and impending reform of some others like the MACC, the SPR and the civil service, and the replacement of self-serving, inefficient top personnel; and third, the adoption of new policies in public transport, education, labour and welfare concerns or disaster management - which are hopefully more pro-people and less wasteful of resources compared to previous policies.

Rising Moon, The: Political Change In Sarawak, 1959-1972Rising Moon, The: Political Change In Sarawak, 1959-1972 by Leigh, Michael

The Rising Moon was the first in-depth study of the beginnings of modern politics in Sarawak between 1959 and 1972. The plural society of that state offered a stark contrast to that elsewhere in Malaysia, for in Sarawak viable political parties spanned ethnic divisions, a development that had not then taken place in the other parts of the nation. Side-by-side with the development of politics came the integration of Sarawak within Malaysia, and all the attendant tensions that followed from the merging of this its largest state within an expanded federation. The resultant pattern of politics was dynamic, and throughout this phase remained quite tentative due in large part to Indonesian confrontation and the armed activities of the local communist organisation. Amongst the states of Malaysia, Sarawak is unique, as all groups are in a minority, whether they be defined by ethnicity, religion or mother tongue. That necessitated political compromise spanning ethnic, religious and cultural divisions.