Literature

Featured Titles
Humeirah: A Story Of Existence, Beauty And WisdomHumeirah: A Story Of Existence, Beauty And Wisdom by Carrim, Sabah

Humeirah - A story about Beauty, Existence and Wisdom Humeirah is the story of a woman who faces the silence and the void amid the noise and clamor of a close knit society. Intelligent, reflective, and a keen-observer of the disharmony and hypocrisy of the people who surround her, she is on the constant lookout for something deeper and more sincere. Instead, she faces the incongruences with which society deals with the beautiful and provocative Sana; or even her own husband Haider, whom society reveres for reasons that don't make sense. A certain distance sets in between Humeirah and her daughter Warissah, as the former fears that getting close to her daughter would mean passing on the flaws and defects that society has labeled her with. Humeirah is an introspective story of a woman born on the island of Mauritius. It is also about the Kutchi Mehmans who live on that island; their arrogance and their sense of superiority over all other Indian-Muslim immigrants.

Semi-ApesSemi-Apes by Carrim, Sabah

Semi-apes is a story celebrating life and death, homogeneity and diversity, belief and disbelief. It is told from Heera's perspective as she comments on the pursuits of people who surround her, and how they struggle with that against their own psychological make-up. Heera takes us to the darkest corners of Alif's life, the oppression and injustice that she endures; Khosrow uncle's experiences, and his struggle in finding meaning to life; and Layla aunty who is juggled between her psychiatrists and a disloyal husband. But Heera is not only an observer. Like others, she displays her own inconsistencies, her prejudices, and her misgivings. In the end, Semi-apes is about everybody's attempt to be unique and different, to strive to lead better lives, and in the process, by the working of an arbitrary law, succeed and lose at times, and lose and succeed at others.

Song Of The Sun GodSong Of The Sun God by Chandran, Shankari

In a time of upheaval, can Nala keep her family together? The capital city - a little boy watches a monk wrap himself in flames… A village in Jaffna - a little girl is bursting with life…Nala and Ranjan are on the brink of an exciting future. They will meet, marry and fall in love. They will set up house and have children. They will map out their future together, but destiny has other plans for them. Will they survive? This is a deeply moving saga spanning three continents and three generations. Lush physical details and an emotional recounting of events as they relentlessly unfold, reveal a heart-wrenching story of family, love, laughter, sorrow and new beginnings.

Abuse Suxxx!!! And Other PlaysAbuse Suxxx!!! And Other Plays by Sharma, Haresh

Featuring five plays by Cultural Medallion recipient Haresh Sharma, created over a span of two decades, Abuse Suxxx! and Other Plays is an audacious collection that casts a spotlight on LGBT lives and issues explored in The Necessary Stage's productions. Yet these plays go beyond being simply out, loud and proud. Rather, they deal with a range of topics and advocate tolerance and acceptance of difference in our midst.

Portrait Of Singapore Malay Poetry, APortrait Of Singapore Malay Poetry, A by Isa Kamari; Abdul Rahman (Trans.)

In addition to celebrating the intellectual tradition of a past generation of Singaporean Malay thinkers, social and cultural activists, this series provides unique insights and perspectives into the lived-experience and collective memories of the Malay community in Singapore. This is the English translation of Isa Kamari's Potret Puisi Melayu Singapura, which features the works of 44 Singapore Malay poets, from the post-independence era to the present, and shows how the historical context, community and the individuality of the poet have given poetry written by Singaporean Malay writers its own distinctive identity.

HaikukuHaikuku by Gwee Li Sui

This volume could well be subtitled the social history of Singapore in 120 haiku. There are haiku about MRT breakdown, rat infestation, haze, 377A, hungry ghosts and cavorting community cats. There are also those of matters of socio-political import: 2011 GE, population management, personal data protection, leadership renewal and compassionate meritocracy. Gwee adds to his army haiku that won prizes from the SAF with others of a military theme in Purple Light and Tekong diarrhea. Then there are newsy haiku reporting on NIMBY, the royal visit, that Holland V bank robbery plus The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye. He does not forget the newsmakers either - the otters, the Little India Riot hero, A-Mei, Subhas Anandan, Phey Yew Kok, Joseph Schooling and that si geena who shall not be named. Also remembered is our dear Ah Kong in a pair of death anniversary haiku, and a sad one about the empty parade chair. There are haiku about our places we love, the hawker centre, cenotaph, kopitiam, Sungei Road, Singapore River…. This is book of haiku, backed by a nation-wide haiku writing contest, for every Singaporean - kuku or not.

Faith Ng: Plays Volume OneFaith Ng: Plays Volume One by Ng, Faith; Ho, Lucas (Ed.)

This collection gathers together eight compelling plays by Checkpoint Theatre's Associate Artist Faith Ng. This includes Normal (2015), a stark look at the education system which played to a sold-out audience, and For Better or for Worse (2013) and wo(men) (2010), critically acclaimed plays which offer unflinching portraits of how families can build up and break down individuals. Shorter plays and collaborations with a diverse range of theatre-makers are featured as well, including You are My Needle, I am Your Thread (2015). Deeply affecting and sensitively crafted, these plays firmly establish Faith Ng as a vital Singapore playwright.

Book Of Changes, ABook Of Changes, A by Lim Wei Jie, Daryl

Change is what happens to everything: history is humanity's attempt to make sense of this inevitability. In his debut collection of poetry, Daryl Lim Wei Jie paints minute strokes that give way to panoramas, strewn with unusual asides: migrants crossing oceans; an ancient king reclaiming a throne; rivers clogged with corpses; the paperwork for an invasion; a milo dinosaur the height of Mount Everest. A Book of Changes is a young poet's attempt to make sense of the impossible ebb and flow of time.

Field Guide To Supermarkets In Singapore, AField Guide To Supermarkets In Singapore, A by Lee, Samuel

A Field Guide to Supermarkets in Singapore is a 19th century reference book (on philology? art history? anthropology? nobody remembers) that fell into a tropical swamp and was rescued, then lovingly restored, by a nice lady in curlers. Caked in organic matter too dense to scrub off, the pages of Samuel Lee's debut collection reveal visions and premonitions of a city filled with characters engaged in their own private sorrows, both minute and expansive. To read him is to be lost in the aisles of millennia.

Altered Straits: A NovelAltered Straits: A Novel by Wong, Kevin Martens

In an alternate 1947 filled with mystical creatures, Singapuran boy-soldier Naufal Jazair is bonded to the merlion Bahana and enlisted in a war against an aggressive neighbour. Meanwhile, in a dystopian Singapore in 2047, SAF officer Titus Ang is tasked with entering Naufal's universe and retrieving a merlion to save the future of Singapore from the Concordance, a hive intelligence that is close to consuming what remains of humanity.

Bamboo RoadBamboo Road by Bennet, Anne

Thailand 1942: Sirinya and her family are members of the Thai underground, who risk their lives to resist the World War Two Japanese occupation and to and help British prisoners of war building the Thai-Burma railway. The events of those years have repercussions for decades to come. The book tells Sirinya's wartime story and how in the 1970s she returns to Kanchanaburi after a long absence abroad, to settle old scores from the war years. Bamboo Road is volume three in a Southeast Asian WWII trilogy that includes Bamboo Heart and Bamboo Island (the books may be read in any order).

Singapore RedSingapore Red by Gibson, William L.

Singapore/Malaya, 1890s: A cholera epidemic breaks out in Singapore's congested Chinatown, and Detective Inspector Hawksworth finds himself embroiled in a case that threatens to spill over into regional warfare. While the immigrant population threatens to riot, someone is smuggling powerful new American weapons into the British colony, and rumours of Chinese undead wandering the night-time streets puts even the powerful Chinese clans on edge. Explore the dark underbelly of 19th-century Singapore and Malaya in this hard-boiled historical thriller trilogy, comprising Singapore Black, Singapore Yellow and Singapore Red.

Payoh: A NovelPayoh: A Novel by Tan, Jim

In a writing workshop at Changi Prison, retired professor JG Chan encounters a story written by inmate Alphonsus Goh. 'Payoh' tells the adventures of a sulphur-crested cockatoo named Lucky who finds his way to a protected bird sanctuary. Conflict soon ensues, and the sanctuary birds decide it's time to gain autonomy from their human-watchers. They assemble a small team of leaders to govern their newly independent sanctuary. However, skeptics and detractors also exist within.

City Book, The - SingaporeCity Book, The - Singapore by Luakian, Maloy (Ed.)

The City Book - Singapore combines both art and adventure, combining a series of unique stories told from the perspectives of local contemporary artists. Each narrative brings us on a personal journey of life in Singapore, with stories that reflect the diverse perspectives of culture, exploring themes including urban isolation, nostalgia, nature, and life in transitory spaces. These stories are supplemented by art to reflect their unique relationships with different elements of the city.

Burning Lake, TheBurning Lake, The by Hart, Jonathan Locke

In this book of poetry, Jonathan Locke Hart explores in a contemporary context the divine and human comedy, taking his inspiration from Dante.

Furrie And Shortie - Issue #1: To Be The Most Wonderful YouFurrie And Shortie - Issue #1: To Be The Most Wonderful You by Teo, James

Furrie and Shortie - Issue #1 : To be the most wonderful you, is about these 2 characters - one's shortcoming is being furry (therefore, not too good for weather in Singapore), while the other too short in the world in love with everything big and tall. Furrie is usually the pessimistic one, while Shortie became the ultimate optimist. They are old skool comic oddballs who stick out a little from everyone else. That's why Furrie in one chapter has an identity crisis and wanders into the jungle! And in another, they encounter some troubling behaviors in society today, and in their own small and hopefully funny ways, they act - for good! One thing for sure, we wanted people who read our book to believe that life - no matter how dark - can still get better if you allow yourself to be the most wonderful you. The book has very few text and is dual language.

Indonesia And Not, Poems And Otherwise: Anecdotes ScatteredIndonesia And Not, Poems And Otherwise: Anecdotes Scattered by Lane, Max

A collection of poems, vignettes and short stories set in Indonesia, the Philippines and Australia between 1969 and today.

Collected Hong Kong StoriesCollected Hong Kong Stories by David T. K. Wong

For an arresting mosaic of the great and complex metropolis known as Hong Kong - and an insight into what the people of the city live by and die for - a reader need look no further than the Collected Hong Kong Stories of David T. K. Wong. Wong, a native son of this once British Crown Colony and now Special Administrative Region of China, has drawn upon his own experiences as a journalist, educator, government official and businessman to assemble a range of memorable characters for his tales. They range from barmen to labourers, from jockeys to expatriate bureaucrats, from scholars to tycoons, and each is infused with insights into the collective soul of the edgy, anomalous and perplexing place he finds himself. These 18 stories are carefully crafted in the grand tradition of O. Henry, Maugham and Saki. Each has been individually published in a magazine or broadcast over radio in Britain, the United States, Hong Kong or elsewhere. They can be dipped into and savoured separately or feasted upon all in one go. Either way, the result can only be satisfying.

Singpowrimo 2016: The AnthologySingpowrimo 2016: The Anthology by Qilin Yam, Daryl; Joshua Lp; Ruth Tang (Eds.)

Singapore Poetry Writing Month, or as we affectionately call it, SingPoWriMo. Write one poem a day for thirty days in the cruel month of April: that was the challenge we first gave the Internet in 2014. In its third year, our anthology gathers the best of the 5,110 poems that were submitted in 2016. Daily challenging prompts reflected on the Singaporean condition, with verses written for every MRT and LRT station, poems that upgraded other poems that upgraded other poems and so on. We are proud to feature first-time poets beside established bards, a wide swath of language -with poems in Minion next to poems in HTML - and the recently-revived form of the udaiyaathathu alongside the ground-breaking twin cinema and asingbol.

Every Moving Thing That Lives Shall Be FoodEvery Moving Thing That Lives Shall Be Food by Chia, Grace

A Singapore emigrant muses about the HDB heartlands and her adopted British lifestyle. An undergrad gets culture shock travelling abroad to Canada for the first time. A vegetarian Western tourist finds a meatier version of Asia in a massage palour. A desperate male sniffs around a lone cougar. An expat wife seeks solace in a Kundera-quoting freelance artist. And a workaholic widower gets enlightened in his last days. Grace Chia's Every Moving Thing That Lives Shall Be Food is a smorgasbord of short stories that tells of individuals whose appetite for a spicier taste of life is driven by hunger, human folly and unhealthy cravings.