History & Geography

Featured Titles
Ipoh: When Tin Was King (Vol. 1 & 2)Ipoh: When Tin Was King (Vol. 1 & 2) by Ho Tak Ming

In spite of being sidelined as an official town by the colonial government, Ipoh could still consider herself the most favoured of Malayan towns. For she had one thing in abundance - tin! Tin gave Ipoh more millionaires than any other Malayan town; it gave her confidence and vibrancy; it gave her a soul. This is the story of Ipoh's Golden Age, an era that is now shrouded in the mist of time, but which present-day Ipohites can take pride in and draw inspiration from.

Glimpses Of Penang's PastGlimpses Of Penang's Past by Loh Wei Leng

Selected and introduction by Badriyah Haji Salleh and Loh Wei Leng, this selection of articles provide a bird's eye view of Penang's past. It covers broad themes such as the British imperial enterprise and the incorporation of their Southeast Asian settlement into the world economy as suppliers of raw materials and importers of western manufactures; the agency of local actors in the face of Anglo-Dutch rivalry; and the myriad consequences of imperialism - political, economic, social and cultural.

50 Years Of Indian Community In Singapore by Pillai, Gopinath; K Kesavapany

From Tamils to Malayalees, from Bengalis to Punjabis, the diverse Indian community in Singapore has played a large part in building the country. This celebratory volume highlights the progress, contributions and challenges of the community for the past 50 years since Singapore's independence in 1965.

Foreigners Under Mao: Western Lives In China, 1949-1976Foreigners Under Mao: Western Lives In China, 1949-1976 by Hooper, Beverley

This is a pioneering study of the Western community during the turbulent Mao era. Based largely on personal interviews, memoirs, private letters, and archives, this book 'gives a voice' to the Westerners who lived under Mao. It shows that China was not as closed to Western residents as has often been portrayed. The book examines the lives of six different groups of Westerners: 'foreign comrades' who made their home in Mao's China, twenty-two former Korean War POWs who controversially chose China ahead of repatriation, diplomats of Western countries that recognized the People's Republic, the few foreign correspondents permitted to work in China, 'foreign experts', and language students.

Kampung Tempe: Voices From A Malay VillageKampung Tempe: Voices From A Malay Village by Yahaya Sanusi & Hidayah Amin

The product of primary oral history research that spanned several years, this book captures glimpses of Kampung Tempe's varied history and records stories of life in the kampong, and of how the villagers produced tempe or fermented soya bean cakes. Kampung Tempe was a Javanese/Malay kampong located at Jalan Haji Alias in Bukit Timah. The only remaining trace of the kampung is the presence of the kampung's mosque, Masjid Al-Huda, which was in the past referred to as Masjid Kampung Tempe.

Malayan Emergency, The: Essays On A Small, Distant WarMalayan Emergency, The: Essays On A Small, Distant War by Yao Souchou

Throughout the book runs a passionate concern for the lives and struggles of ordinary men and women in colonial Malaya. Here, the effect of counterinsurgency measures are captured by the anthropologist's art of ethnography and cultural analysis. Among the vignettes are an ethnographic encounter with a woman ex-guerrilla, and the author's remembrance of his insurgent-cousin killed in a police ambush. As such, this fascinating study examines the Emergency afresh, and in the process brings into focus issues not normally covered in other accounts: nostalgia and failed revolution, socialist fantasy and ethnic relations, and the moral costs of modern counterinsurgency.

Genghis Khan: The Man Who Conquered The WorldGenghis Khan: The Man Who Conquered The World by Mclynn, Frank

Combining fast-paced accounts of battles with rich cultural background and the latest scholarship, Frank McLynn brings vividly to life the strange world of the Mongols, describes Temujin's rise from boyhood outcast to become Genghis Khan, and provides the most accurate and absorbing account yet of one of the most powerful men ever to have lived.

Raj At War, The: India's Second World War A People's History Of India's Second World WarRaj At War, The: India's Second World War A People's History Of India's Second World War by Khan, Yasmin

The Second World War was not fought by Britain alone. India produced the largest volunteer army in world history: over 2 million men. In this book, we hear the myriad voices of ordinary Indian people, from the first Indian to win the Victoria Cross, the nurses in Indian General Hospitals to labourers and their families in remote villages.

Early Kingdoms: Indonesian Archipelago & The Malay PeninsulaEarly Kingdoms: Indonesian Archipelago & The Malay Peninsula by Munoz, Paul Michel

At a time when sea navigation depended more on the skill and courage of sailors than on technology, men were nonetheless able to build maritime regional empires that stretched from Indochina to the Indonesian Archipelago. This book, which draws on a huge body of archaeological and documentary research, provides a much-needed overview of the history of the Malay Peninsula and insular Southeast Asia from its earliest times to the 16th century. It also provides an in-depth analysis of the international context of the political, economic and social evolution of these kingdoms, and so provides a useful background to the modern history of the region. This is an excellent book for those with a keen interest in the ancient history of the first kingdoms of the Malay Peninsula and Indonesian Archipelago.

Racial Science And Human Diversity In Colonial IndonesiaRacial Science And Human Diversity In Colonial Indonesia by Sysling, Fenneke

Indonesia is home to diverse peoples who differ from one another in terms of physical appearance as well as social and cultural practices. The way such matters are understood is partly rooted in ideas developed by racial scientists working in the Netherlands Indies beginning in the late nineteenth century, who tried to develop systematic ways to define and identify distinctive races. Their work helped spread the idea that race had a scientific basis in anthropometry and craniology, and was central to people's identity, but their encounters in the archipelago also challenged their ideas about race. In this new monograph, Fenneke Sysling draws on published works and private papers to describe the way Dutch racial scientists tried to make sense of the human diversity in the Indonesian archipelago. The making of racial knowledge, it contends, cannot be explained solely in terms of internal European intellectual developments. It was 'on the ground' that ideas about race were made and unmade with a set of knowledge strategies that did not always combine well. Sysling describes how skulls were assembled through the colonial infrastructure, how measuring sessions were resisted, what role photography and plaster casting played in racial science and shows how these aspects of science in practice were entangled with the Dutch colonial Empire.

Royal Siamese State Railway Southern Line 1917Royal Siamese State Railway Southern Line 1917 by Ministry Of Communication

Royal Siamese State Railway Southern Line 1917 is a compilation of various works. The areas dealt with include Souvenir of the Opening of the Royal Siamese State Railway, Southern Line, 1917; Royal State Railways Siam, Southern Line, 1915; Photographs Relating to the Siamese Railway, 1898-1904; Railway Stations; and Thirtieth Annual Report on the Administration of the Royal State Railways, 1917, among others.

Lao Postcards By Alfred Raquez: A Collection Of His 166 Postcards From 1906Lao Postcards By Alfred Raquez: A Collection Of His 166 Postcards From 1906 by Ande, Diethard

This is a first attempt to bring together the 166 postcards that were produced in six series of 25 each as Collection Raquez and 16 out-of-series postcards produced by Decoly as Cliché Raquez and later also under his brand La Pagode. Raquez was the first traveler who systematically made photos in Laos around 1900. He made seven trips in Laos; the longest journey was seven months. Raquez organized the Lao Pavilion at the 1906 Marseille Exhibition, showing his large collection of textiles and artifacts gathered from around Laos.

Sacred Caves Of Tam Ting (Pak On), Luang Prabung, Laos: Mystery, Splendor, And DesecrationSacred Caves Of Tam Ting (Pak On), Luang Prabung, Laos: Mystery, Splendor, And Desecration by Egloff, Brian; Kristin Kelly

The Tam Ting (Pak Ou) Caves, are located some 25km north of the World Heritage Site of Luang Prabang, Laos. In 1992, as Laos was beginning to open up to the world, the University of Canberra and the Department of Information and Culture of the Lao People's Democratic Republic began a five-year collaboration on the conservation of the two caves and on the hundreds of Buddha statues that were found there. The team conducted all work to the highest standards permitted by the circumstances. But ten years after the close of the conservation project, many of the beautiful Buddha figures were gone, taken from their home and yet to be recovered. This is the story of the eaves, of the collaborative international conservation project, and of what happened after the project closed in 1997. It places the caves in context and explains their significance and beauty. The book is both a cautionary tale about the importance and fragility of material cultural heritage, and a message of hope for the future of heritage conservation in the region.

Short History Of British India, AShort History Of British India, A by Carlos, E. S.

Originally published in 1889 for use by the British middle and upper classes to prepare them for colonial administration, this book is a surprisingly sensitive description of India before and during British rule. Carlos, in conjunction with some 'old Indian friends', describes life under British rule, the geography and key religions of India and important historical moments both before and after the British conquest. This book is useful as a record of the colonial mindset near the turn of the twentieth century, and will be of value to anyone interested in the history of the British Empire and historical British attitudes to rule.

Tigers In The Park: The Wartime Heritage Of Adam ParkTigers In The Park: The Wartime Heritage Of Adam Park by Cooper, Jon

Adam Park is a very special place. It is a place where the membrane of time is at its thinnest, where you can reach out and touch history. This book unlocks that past. It prises out those memories from hidden places. It reveals the incredible, untold wartime heritage of the estate and the surrounding area. It is an uncompromising blow-by-blow account of a desperate battle told from the soldier's perspective. It is a day-by-day account of survival in a POW work camp, and a house-by-house account of life in Singapore before, during and after 1942. One estate, one year, one incredible wartime story. A snapshot of history as witnessed from the windows and porticos of each and every house on the Adam Park estate.

Global World Of Indian Merchants, 1750-1947: Traders Of Sind From Bukhara To PanamaGlobal World Of Indian Merchants, 1750-1947: Traders Of Sind From Bukhara To Panama by Markovits, Claude

Claude Markovits' book charts the development of two merchant communities in the province of Sind from the precolonial period, through colonial conquest and up to independence. Based on previously neglected archival sources, it describes how the communities came to control trading networks throughout the world, throwing light on the nature of these diasporas from South Asia in their interaction with the global economy. This is a sophisticated and accessible book that will appeal to students of South Asia, as well as to colonial historians and economic historians.

Portuguese In India, The (The New Cambridge History Of India)Portuguese In India, The (The New Cambridge History Of India) by Pearson, M. N.

The Portuguese were the first European imperial power in Asia. Dr. Pearson's volume of the History is a clear account of their activities in India and the Indian Ocean from the sixteenth century onwards that is written squarely from an Indian point of view. Laying particular stress on social, economic, and religious interaction between Portuguese and Indians, the author argues that the Portuguese had a more limited impact on everyday life in India than is sometimes supposed. Their imperial effort was characterized more by reciprocity and interaction than by an unilateral imposition of Portuguese mores and political structures.

Early Mainland Southeast Asia: From First Humans To AngkorEarly Mainland Southeast Asia: From First Humans To Angkor by Higham, Charles

This synthesis of the latest archaeological discoveries in Southeast Asia begins with the early hunter gatherers and concludes with the early states, with particular reference to Angkor. In conjunction with his own excavations in Northeast Thailand, Charles Higham reviews the important culture of the Iron Age that gave rise to these early civilizations. This book is the only up-to-date account of the ancient cultures of a diverse and geographically expansive area and is a unique compendium, essential for all those interested in this region.

End Of Empire: 100 Days In 1945 That Changed Asia And The WorldEnd Of Empire: 100 Days In 1945 That Changed Asia And The World by Chandler, David P.; R. Cribb & L. Narangoa (Eds.)

Aiming to balance the focus on European events in global public discussions and reminiscences of World War II, End of Empire focuses on a brief, 100-day period at the end of the war across a broad sweep of eastern Asia - a time when the Indonesian and Vietnamese revolutions were born, the fragile wartime truce between Communists and Nationalists in China began to fray, and the first steps were made in Japan towards a new democratic order. Following a chronological order, the volume combines daily events with commentary, photographs, maps and personal accounts. More importantly, it is part of a radical, multi-faceted project to commemorate the period not just in print but also on screen and in 'real-time broadcasts' published day by day. Here, perhaps, is the form of scholarly publishing and learning of the future but without abandoning traditional standards.

Life Beyond The Big Top: Stories Of The Tai Thean Kew CircusLife Beyond The Big Top: Stories Of The Tai Thean Kew Circus by Wong, Adele

This is a photo book that captures the history of the Tai Thean Kew Circus, a once-great Chinese circus established in Singapore in 1929. The collection of old photographs and surviving props and costumes that makes up this visual documentation belongs to Sze Ling Fen and Wong Fu Qi, lead performers of the circus. Sze Ling Fen's progenitors founded the circus, and through her eyes we get a glimpse of an almost five-decade-long performing career.